Photography: Camera vs. Knowledge


My passion is photography. It is the reason I cannot be too far away from a camera.  My kids are growing up knowing how to pose for ‘mummy’ and are learning how to use a camera themselves.  My favourite thing about photography is how it is not limited to just one kind of person or even one kind of photographer. While I love to shoot travel photography, people, and self portraits you may like to photograph animals and pets. Perhaps you like to capture the little details around in life or maybe you are fascinated by black and white photos. When it comes to photography, the world is your oyster. Be inspired. Pick up your camera and shoot what you love to photograph.

Every week I get emails, comments on the blog, and messages across different social media platforms about camera equipment.  The most asked questions revolve around what camera I shoot with, what camera I suggest they get, or to give my opinion on which camera brand is better: Canon or Nikon.

I get it. Years ago when I was ready to get my first DSLR and I felt I had to get a Canon camera. Why? Due to the fact my favourite photographer used a Canon and since I was interested in fashion photography at the time I found most of the photographers I followed all shot with a Canon. My husband on the other hand was sold on getting a Nikon because he believes they have better quality glass (aka lenses) and we ended up getting a Nikon DSLR. I remember being sad at first that I lost the Canon vs. Nikon battle, but in the end that was ludicrous. Any bad photos I took when I first go that camera was not because it was a certain brand, it was because I was not an expert with using my camera yet.  I shot mostly in auto modes (this means aperture priority and shutter priority too) and was still getting photos that were blurry or with the incorrect exposure. Not to mention all the other facets of photography that I was not fully utilizing like composition, telling a story, and creating interest.

What Camera You Have vs. Lenses & Knowing How to Shoot in Manual 
Honestly it does not matter what camera you have or what camera brand family you use. Yes there will be differences between cameras. Comparing two different Nikon cameras that I have owned one could shoot with an ISO up to 1600 while another up to 3200, meaning the second shot better in low light situations. However, I have also taken photos with both cameras and have had people choose incorrectly which camera shot which photo. Take a look again at the photo I posted of my sons.


The blurred background behind them was not created in photoshop. This was shot in manual on a sunny day in open shade.  I wanted to create a shallow depth of field, meaning my subjects would be sharp in focus while the backdrop is blurry.  This is great for portraits because it draws your eyes to where your focus is in the frame.  I could have equally shot this with a different lens that does not have as wide an aperture at 1.4 and it would have come out differently. Or I could have used the same lens and on my camera changed the aperture so that everything in the frame was in focus.  I could have also had my kids step out of the shade and have the direct sunlight blind them in the eyes and cause harsh shadows on their face.  Take it a step further and I could have not got in close to them so that the sky would also be in the photo and rely on my camera to expose the photograph for their faces in the shade, making the sky overexposed, void of detail, and bright white. Of course in manual I could now compensate the exposure so that I have better exposed skies while still being able to have my boys nicely in the shot. You could basically have a line of photographers all shooting with the same camera but different lenses among them shooting at different settings (in regards to aperture, shutter speed, and iso) and have a different photo from each photographer. That is what inspires me as a photographer knowing how much control I have in manual as well as how much creative control I have to get to my end result.

With that said you do not need a fancy DSLR to take great photos. You can do it with a simple point and shoot with manual capabilities.  You own the technology and I encourage you all to push yourself this coming year to learn more about what you are capable of with your camera.

Need more help? Wondering why your photos are not exposed correctly?  Wondering how to get sharper clearer images?  Wondering what all the buttons on your camera do?  Then I suggest B. In Focus, which teaches to to shoot in manual while building you up as a photographer with your creative vision.


B. In Focus | An intro to photography course that teaches you to shoot in manual. Also great for intermediates who need a refresher on how to get their camera to do what they want it to. We cover white balance, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, lighting techniques, composition, and creative elements of creating a photograph.

B. Retouched | A post processing class in photoshop for retouching people and faces.  We cover different ways to retouch people of different ages, quick fixes, and even how to apply make-up in photoshop.  If you are a beginner with photoshop, do not fear as we cover everything you will need to know to complete this course.

B. Processed | Geared towards the beginners in photoshop for photographers and bloggers. Learn what to do with your photos out of the camera to make them web ready.  From saving, archiving, organizing, and protecting your images to cropping, resizing, layers, and other elements in photoshop to make it a fun and simple process!

B. In the Frame | Love photography but want to learn more about your camera and push yourself further?  Self portraits are a great way to gain experience and learn new techniques.  With this course we cover creative self portraits which begin before you even pick up your camera, during the shooting process, and afterwards in post processing. If you are ready to embrace the creative side of yourself and create art this is the class for you!

B. Illuminated | Photography is all about light! B.Lux got it’s name from the measurement of light and in this course we go in-depth in lighting approaches and techniques. From shooting in natural light, in low light, and with additional light sources. I show you what you can do for a lot of money and what you can do for little to no additional cost.  We work both inside and out on location and you can learn all from the comfort of an online class and working on your own time. Get ready to embrace light and take your photography to the next level.


B.LUX Alumni | What they are saying about their course:
“Having bought a new DSLR and knowing little about using manual, I decided to try Bonnie Rose’s B.Lux photography course, B. in Focus.  After seeing Bonnie’s photography on her blog and having conversations with her, I knew I wanted to learn more from her.  I now have the basic concepts of using my camera in manual and I no longer need to bring a back up point and shoot on my travels.  Bonnie is great and if you need a push to get yourself learning in manual then this course is for you!” – Brittany



 For more information and to register for classes: 

* Bonnie Rose Photography © 2007 – 2013 All Rights Reseved
  • Melanie Fontaine

    I completely agree! I think people often forget that a camera only provides the technology, whereas the picture is always taken by the photographer. If it was the other way around there would be no need for photographers – computers would do just fine! 😉 I started shooting in manual earlier this year and I honestly has changed my view on photography. Not only are my pictures much better – at least now that I’m comfortable with shooting in manual – but I have started to approach photography from a more creative side and it’s one of my goals for the new year to explore that side of photography more. I don’t have a super fancy camera, but before running out and purchasing super expensive equipment, I think it’s important to learn how to get the most out of the camera that you’re using! :) There’s always so much to learn! :)

    • Bonnie Rose

      Thank you for sharing Melanie, it is so refreshing to hear from people who have experienced what I have in realising its not about what camera you have. We downsized our camera equipment last year and it really taught me concentrate on the skills not the technology. Honestly you could put an amazing expensive camera in a novices hand and a crappy camera in an experienced photographer’s hands and the person with experience would hands down get amazing photos in comparison. My mum uses a small point and shoot camera she calls her ‘granny cam’ and I was able to show her by switching to manual how she can stop blowing out the skies in her photos by being able to control the exposure. It really opens up a whole new world. I am so excited about your journey with photography and glad it is motivating to continue to learn and grow. Happy snapping Melanie! x